CBC Content Disabled: Remembrance Day, November 11, 2015

Comments regarding the military’s conduct in the War of Terror and white poppies found an unfriendly audience among ICUC’s legion of censors around the world.

IMG_20151112_075702
Quoting previous comment: ” ‘ You might not support the mission, but you have to support the troops.’ Not if they’re committing war crimes we don’t. That’s why Chretien shut down the Canadian Airborne Regiment.” (3 likes) November 11, 2015.

A lament for the Canadian Airborne

By Robert Smol special to , CBC News Posted: Mar 03, 2010

http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/a-lament-for-the-canadian-airborne-1.931658

…It was in this environment, in early March 1993 that a group of airborne troops set a trap for local teens who were stealing from the base, shooting and killing one in the process. Then, a week or so later, another Somali teen, Shidane Arone, was found hiding in a base latrine. 

Pte. Kyle Brown during his court martial hearing in Petawawa in March 1994. He was convicted and sentenced to five years for his role in the death of Somali teenager Shidane Arone. The other soldier involved, Clayton Matchlee, was deemed unfit to stand trial following a failed suicide attempt. (Canadian Press)

His torture and beating death at the hands of two Airborne soldiers, who took trophy photos along the way, became the ultimate symbol of what Canada’s involvement there was all about, at least on the home front…

IMG_20151112_075719
“Are u.s. and other ‘allied’ troops still guarding poppy fields in Afghanistan and shipping the finished product home? I’m wearing a white poppy. I’m done with this crap.” (2 likes). November 11, 2015.

A Maze of Complication in the Afghan Poppy Fields

http://atwar.blogs.nytimes.com/2012/05/29/a-maze-of-complication-in-the-afghan-poppy-fields/?_r=0

\

Bryan Denton for The New York TimesIn April, Afghan and American soldiers patrolled through poppy fields in the village of Barakzai, in the Sangesar area of the Zhare district. (c) New York Times 2012
Bryan Denton for The New York TimesIn April, Afghan and American soldiers patrolled through poppy fields in the village of Barakzai, in the Sangesar area of the Zhare district. (c) New York Times 2012
poppypackstrip
White poppy lapels. (c) Peace Pledge Union

White poppies are hard to come by in Canada. You can order yours in time for next Remembrance Day from the Peace Pledge Union in London. http://www.ppu.org.uk/whitepoppy/. They cost approximately C$20 (including shipping to Canada) for a package of ten.

From the Peace Pledge Union:

The White Poppy symbolises the belief that there are better ways to resolve conflicts and embodies values that reject killing fellow human beings for whatever reason. Our work, primarily educational, draws attention to many of our social values and habits which make continuing violence a likely outcome.

From economic reliance on arms sales (Britain is the world’s second largest arms exporter) to maintaining manifestly useless nuclear weapons Britain contributes significantly to international instability. The outcome of the recent military adventures highlights their ineffectiveness and grim consequences.

Now nearly 100 years after the end of the ‘war to end all wars’ we still have a long way to go to put an end to a social institution, which in even in the last decade contributed to the killing of millions.

My wife is into Facebook. I am not. However, she was saying a “Facebook friend” in Keswick, Ontario (some fifty miles north of Toronto) was bemoaning the number of people walking around town with white poppies instead of the traditional red ones, as sold, franchised, copyrighted, trademarked and enforced by the Royal Canadian Legion, a nationwide chain of drinking halls in Canada. If somebody up there in Keswick, Newmarket or the environs of York Region is taking the time (and expense) to distribute the Peace Pledge Union’s white poppies, I would personally like to thank you. Whoever you are.

Sorry, Royal Canadian Legion. But the red poppy has become synonymous with war and glorification. It has gone beyond remembering the war dead and the brave sacrifice (as I was taught as a boy) to a call to continue throwing our young men (and even women now) into the meat grinder of the u.s. War of Terror. And any suggestion that we might stop this fraudulent war is met with howls of protest and indignation of all the young people who will have died in vain.

Arlington National Cemetery March 27, 2014 2
Cenotaph at Arlington National Cemetery’s Canadian War section, Arlington, Virginia, March 27, 2014 (LettersToTheBeast)
Canadian war section at Arlington National Cemetery, March 27, 2014 (LettersToTheBeast)
Canadian war section at Arlington National Cemetery, Arlington, Virginia, March 27, 2014 (LettersToTheBeast)
Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s